Sheldon Cooper lives a magical life. Not only does he have Asperger’s but he has a loyal support group of friends and family. His symptoms are merely quirky and endearing, if a bit off-putting. Sheldon has even deceived the writers on “Big Bang Theory” into saying that he really isn’t an Aspie. But he is not a prime specimen of the trait.

Most people high on the spectrum do not have a support group. Most experience bullying that goes far beyond the occasional wedgie. Most are emotionally crushed by inability to fit in socially. Some of us develop harmless interests that others deem bizarre or obsessive.

This perception of cuteness can get in the way of relating to the reality.

Here’s an article that expresses this better than I ever could:

The Problem with Sheldon Cooper and the “Cute Autism”

Lydia Netzer

 

And here is a good article outlining the special problems that folks on the spectrum encounter on the internet. Although not all people on the spectrum can rightly be said to have a “disorder”. That’s like saying short people have a disorder or people who sunburn easily. I resist the notion that simply not fitting in is illness, mental or otherwise.

A Helpful Online Safety Guide for People With Autism Spectrum Disorders